Like Blacks, Beaners are Also Retarded: Illiteracy Among Hispanic Immigrants Persists Across Generations According to Report

Like Blacks, Beaners are Also Retarded: Illiteracy Among Hispanic Immigrants Persists Across Generations According to Report

Hispanic immigrants and their children lag far behind other migrant populations in the U.S. when it comes to developing proficiency in English, according to a new analysis from a Washington immigration policy think tank.

About two-thirds of Hispanic immigrants who have been in the U.S. for at least 15 years can be considered “functionally illiterate” in English, says independent public policy analyst Jason Richwine. In his report for the Center for Immigration Studies, a conservative-leaning nonprofit that advocates lower levels of immigration, he looked at data from a literacy test administered to more than 8,000 Americans from 2012 and 2014 and discovered some worrying results.

To measure the English ability of immigrants in the United States, researchers often rely on the opinion of the immigrants themselves. For example, the Census Bureau asks foreign-language speakers, “How well [do you] speak English?” and gives them four choices: “very well”, “well”, “not well”, or “not at all”. Answers are highly subjective, as speaking English “well” might mean anything from basic comprehension to near fluency. For objective data, this report turns to a direct test of English literacy administered by the Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC). The results raise concerns about the magnitude and persistence of low English ability among immigrants.

Specifically:

  • 41 percent of immigrants score at or below the lowest level of English literacy — a level variously described as “below basic” or “functional illiteracy”.
  • The average immigrant scores at the 21st percentile of the native score distribution.
  • Hispanic immigrants struggle the most with English literacy. Their average score falls at the 8th percentile, and 63 percent are below basic.
  • For Hispanic immigrants, self-reported English-speaking ability overstates actual literacy. The average literacy score of Hispanic immigrants who self-report that they speak English “very well” or “well” falls at the 18th percentile, and 44 percent are below basic.
  • Even long-time residents struggle with English literacy. Immigrants who first arrived in the United States more than 15 years ago score at the 20th percentile, and 43 percent are below basic.
  • Literacy difficulties brought by low-skill immigrants persist beyond the immigrant generation. The children of Hispanic immigrants score at the 34th percentile, and 22 percent are below basic. In addition, just 5 percent of second generation Hispanics have “elite” literacy skills, compared to 14 percent of natives overall.

Richwine found that 67 percent of first-generation Hispanics scored at the “below basic” level on the Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC) test of English proficiency. In contrast, just 22 percent of non-Hispanic immigrants who had been in the U.S. for at least 15 years were at the “below basic” level of literacy.

Individuals at that level possess only a simple vocabulary and sentence comprehension, and they cannot complete more complex tasks such as reading multiple pages of a document or making inferences from charts and graphs. While Hispanic immigrants, who are poorer and less educated than the overall immigrant population when they arrive in the U.S., can be expected to struggle with English comprehension, the report found that literacy problems persist beyond the first generation.

The children of Hispanic immigrants score at the 34th percentile on the PIAAC test, and 22 percent test at the “below basic” level. Performance actually worsens in the third generation: nearly a quarter — 24 percent — of the grandchildren of Hispanic immigrants failed to score above the lowest English literacy rating. Those results suggest that Hispanic immigrants, compared to the overall immigration population, may not be assimilating as well as scholars and lawmakers believe.

wetbacks and guns

Monkey see, monkey do

“The importance of English literacy cannot be overstated,” Richwine wrote.

“Without language proficiency, immigrant families will find it difficult to succeed in the mainstream of American society, and high rates of English illiteracy may be a sign of poor immigrant assimilation.

Policymakers should take note.”

Read the full report here.

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  • ShermanRMcCoy

    I see the apes are going full-on chimpout in the FB comments because facts “be rayciss ‘n sheet.”

    Glad I have no account there.

    But mostly, just thanking the good Lord He made me white.